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Tuesday, February 7, 2012

KOREAN RECIPE: Five Grain Rice and Cooked Vegetables

Ogokbap (오곡밥) and Namul (나물)




Ogokbap (오곡밥, “Five Grain Cooked Rice” ) and Namul (나물, “Cooked Herbs and Vegetables”) are must dishes to have on Jeongweol Daeboreum.  Ancient Koreans consumed nine loads of firewood to cook Daeboreum dishes, had nine bowls of Ogokbap starting from Daeboreum Eve until the end of Daeboreum Day, and had nine kinds of Namul

It was a tradition that they shared Ogokbap with their neighbors – they were supposed to eat at least three bowls out of nine at different neighbors’.  And there was another tradition called Bokssam (복쌈, “lucky wraps”) that may translate to “Wrap blessings and eat them.” Koreans usually use 2½x4 or 3x4 inch Gim (, “dried lavers”) rectangles, fresh Chwi (취, “Korean aster leaves”), blanched Baechunnip (배춧잎, “Korean cabbage leaves”),  or Ssammu (쌈무, “paper-thinly-sliced radish pickles”) to wrap a spoonful of Ogokbap.  It was believed that you will not suffer from heatstroke during summer if you eat nine kinds of Namul on Daeboreum since the Namul dishes provide enough nutrients that you are prone to be deficient of during winter. 


1. OGOKBAP


INGREDIENTS:  2 cups Chapssal (glutinous or sweet rice), 1 cup Mepssal (white short rice), ¼ cup Pat (red bean), ¼ cup Bamkong (Scarlet runner bean), ¼ cup Chajo (glutinous Korean millet), ½ cup Chalsusu (glutinous Korean sorghum), 10 chestnuts, 10 Daechu (Korean jujube), 1 tsp salt, 2¾ cup water



(1) Authentic, Traditional Way

PREPARATIONS: 

Bamkong
 Wash and soak Scarlet runner beans in cold water for 24 hours.

Chapssal & Mepssal
 Wash and soak glutinous/sweet and white rice together in cold water at least for 3 hours.
 Drain through a strainer.

Pat
 Wash red beans thoroughly.
 Pour 5 cups of water in a pot and boil the red beans until the water starts bubbling.
 Drain all the water in the pot.
 Boil the beans again in water till they become tender but still retain their shape.
 Drain through a strainer and set aside red bean broth to use it in rice cooking later.

Susu
 Wash glutinous Korean sorghum several times and soak in water at least for 30 minutes to remove puckery, rough taste.
 Drain through a strainer.

Jo
 Wash glutinous Korean millet right before cooking and drain through a strainer.

Bam
(Optional)
 Peel chestnuts (or purchase already-peeled ones).
 Cut each into quarters.
 Wash them thoroughly and pat them dry.

Daechu
(Optional)
 Wash Korean jujubes thoroughly and pat them dry.


          ○ All the ingredients listed here are available at your local Korean markets.


COOKING

1.  Put all the ingredients above in a rice cooker. (I prefer/recommend an electronic pressure rice cooker.)
2.  Pour 2¾ cup water (or red bean broth) in the cooker, add in 1 tsp salt, and press the "Cook" button  – you may add or reduce the amount of water as you prefer.

All the ingredients ready to go in a rice cooker


(2) Simple, Easy Way

PREPARATIONS: 

You don’t need to use all the ingredients listed above.  If you don’t have time to go grocery shopping at your local Korean market or some of the ingredients are not available there, you may only use glutinous/sweet rice, white rice, red beans, and assorted beans.

Wash thoroughly assorted beans and red beans a couple times and soak them all together in cold water for 24 hours. 

 Wash and soak glutinous/sweet and white rice together in cold water at least for 3 hours.

 Wash glutinous Korean sorghum several times and soak in water at least for 30 minutes to remove puckery, rough taste.

Rinse the bean mixture.  Pour 5 cups of water in a pot and boil the beans until the water starts bubbling.  Drain all the water in the pot.  Boil the beans again in water till they become tender but still retain their shape.  Drain the bean mixture through a strainer and set aside bean broth to use it in rice cooking later.  Wash the glutinous Korean millet right before cooking.  Drain the rice mixture, glutinous Korean sorghum and millet through a strainer too.


COOKING

1.  Put the rice mixture, glutinous Korean sorghum and millet in the electronic pressure rice cooker and pour water or bean broth into the cooker up to the level 3 ¾ – you may add or reduce the amount of water as you prefer.  Add in 1 tsp salt.
2.  Add in the cooked bean mixture and press the “Cook” button.


 I minused chestnuts and jujubes from the ingredients
and soaked the assorted beans altogether.
A warm bowl of Ogokbap


2. NINE KINDS OF NAMUL


INGREDIENTS: 

    One fistful of each: 
                           ①dried baby Chwi (Korean aster leaves)
                           ②dried Gosari (Korean bracken)
                           ③dried Toranddae (Taro stems)
                           ④dried Gogumasun (Korean sweet potato stems)
                           ⑤dried baby Gaji (baby eggplants)
                           ⑥dried Hobakggoji (Korean zucchini moons)

    Two of three fistfuls of each: 
                           ⑦Munamul (Julienne-cut fresh radishes)
                           ⑧Kongnamul (fresh Korean soybean sprouts)
                           ⑨Sigeumchinamul (fresh spinach)

   SEASONINGS: Gukganjang (Korean soy sauce for soup) or/and salt to taste
                          minced garlic
                          Deulggaegaru (Perilla seed powder) (optional)
                          dried anchovy powder (optional)
                          chopped green onions
                          toasted sesame seeds
                         ● sesame oil

   STIR-FRYING: grape seed oil
                         Perilla seed oil

    ○ All the ingredients are available at your local Korean markets.
    ○ You can substitute Gochunnip (chili pepper leaves), Musiraegi (radish leaves), 
        or Torannip (Taro leaves) for any of the ingredients above.
    ○ Perilla seed powder is optional.
     Click here to see how to make dried anchovy powder.



(1) Dried Herbs and Vegetables

PREPARATIONS: 

  Wash and soak all the dried herbs and vegetables in cold water at least for 24 hours, stirring and massaging once in a while.  Drain separately through a strainer.


Dried herbs and vegetables need reconstituting.
(From top left clockwise) sweet potato stems, aster leaves,
zucchini moons, and baby eggplants


COOKING

1.  Pour 10 cups of water in a large pot and boil baby Chwi (Korean aster leaves) until tender.

2.  Place a large frying pan over medium heat and pour enough grape seed and Perilla seed oil (about ½ TBSP each) to generously coat the pan.  Add in 1 TBSP of minced garlic and stir-fry a little.

3.  Stir-fry baby Chwi (Korean aster leaves) in the pan.  Add in ½ cup of water, 1 TBSP of dried anchovy powder (optional), Gukganjang (Korean soy sauce for soup) to taste and mix until well combined.

4.  Remove from the heat and mix in the Korean perilla powder (optional).

     ●  Repeat steps 1 through 4 for each of the remaining dried-and-soaked 
         herbs/vegetables except for the zucchini moons, which do not need 
         boiling (step 1).

     ●  Beware raw Taro stems are toxic unless soaked in cold water at least 
         for 24 hours.


Six kinds of Namul served on ONSEMIRO's Daeboreum table:
(from top clockwise) Chwi (aster leaves), Gaji (baby eggplants),
Gochunnip (chili pepper leaves), Musiraegi (radish leaves),
Gogumasun (sweet potato leaves), and Hobakggoji (zucchini moons-middle)


(2) Fresh Vegetables

COOKING MUNAMUL (Julienne-cut fresh radishes)

1.  Place a large frying pan over medium heat and pour enough grape seed and Perilla seed oil (about ½ TBSP each) to generously coat the pan.  Add in 1 TBSP of minced garlic and stir-fry a little.

2.  Stir-fry Munamul in the pan for about 5 minutes.  Add in ½ cup of water and cook with the lid on for another 5 minutes.  Add salt to taste and 1 TBSP of finely chopped green onions.  Cook for the remaining time without the lid on to burn off the extra moisture.


COOKING KONGNAMUL (fresh Korean soybean sprouts)

1.  Wash the soybean sprouts several times and soak in cold water at least for an hour to remove any water soluble impurities.
2.  Place in a pot and add in water and 1½ tsp of salt.  Boil without the lid on lest the soybean sprouts stink.  Cook until they are tender but not mushy.  Drain through a strainer.
3.  In a large bowl, combine the soybean sprouts, 1 TBSP of finely chopped green onions, 1 tsp of minced garlic, and 1 tsp of toasted sesame seeds, and toss.
4.  Add additional salt to taste and sesame oil.  Combine well.


COOKING SIGEUMCHI (fresh spinach)

1.  Wash the spinach several times.
2.  Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat.  Add in a pinch or two of salt.
3.  Put the spinach in the boiling water and allow them to boil for 20~30 seconds.  Be careful not to overcook as this will make the leaves mushy and deplete the nutritional value.
4.  Put the blanched spinach in the ice water.  Leave them in the water until no longer warm. This will help stop the cooking process, retain the nutrients, and prevent discoloration.
5.  Drain the spinach and squeeze out excess water.
6.  In a large bowl, combine the spinach, 1 tsp of minced garlic, and 1 tsp of toasted sesame seeds, and toss.
7.  Add additional salt to taste and sesame oil.  Combine well.


Six kinds of Namul served on RaOn's Daeboreum table:
(from top left clockwise) Gosari (bracken), 
Torannip (Taro leaves),
 Gogumasun (sweet potato leaves),  
Chwi (aster leaves), Toranddae (Taro stems), 
and Kongnamul (soybean sprouts)


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